Why Run A Food Drive?

  •  Last year, food drives provided one-third of all the food distributed by The Food Bank of Lower Fairfield County, Inc. The efforts of our local businesses, schools, churches and clubs helped feed over 162,000 individuals (unduplicated only within each agency) in the community.
  • Participating in a food drive is one way that people can join together in small groups to have a large impact on hunger, a devastating problem for thousands of people in our community.
  • The Food Bank provides food to more than 85 agencies and programs serving people in need. When your food donations arrive at our warehouse store, they are inspected and sorted by our staff and volunteers. Next, our member agencies come to the warehouse store and "shop" for the items that they need. Finally, they take the food back to the populations they serve and provide them with prepared meals, groceries, or both, depending on the type of program they run. Some of our agencies include: Neighbor to Neighbor, Person to Person, The Salvation Army, Open Door Shelter, New Covenant House, and Shelter for the Homeless.
  • Financial donations collected during food drives are used to purchase nutritious foods that are needed in greater quantities than that which is donated to The Food Bank. These funds also are used to help cover the costs associated with distributing the food.
Donations are tax deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law.
 

 

How to Run a Food Drive at Your Business, House of Worship, or Club.

 

The Food Bank welcomes the opportunity to walk you through the easy, but very important process of conducting a food drive. Many people conduct food drives at holiday times. However, please keep in mind that hunger is an everyday event. A food drive anytime of the year is greatly appreciated.

The Food Bank is located at 461 Glenbrook Road in Stamford. It acts as a hub collecting food from various sources, which is distributed to its 85 member agencies and programs throughout lower Fairfield County. Food drives are important because they can produce an enormous supply of quality food. The food collected helps feed the clients of The Food Bank’s member agencies. In 2012, The Food Bank distributed over 2,000,000 pounds of food.

What kinds of food are collected at a food drive? All nonperishable, unopened food. For a list of the most needed food, click here for Food Donations.

We recommend that you advertise your food drive in your organization’s newsletter, in flyers, and on posters. Make sure you include the who (your contact info), the why (to support The Food Bank’s mission), the where (the location of the collection bins or boxes), and the when (choose specific dates when the collection begins and when it ends). If you are distributing flyers, make sure to allow enough time for your donors to receive the flyer and obtain the food to be donated (e.g., a flyer distributed on a Tuesday for a food drive to start the following Monday and to end on Friday, should provide sufficient notice).

If you need bins or boxes for collection of the food, please contact The Food Bank a few days before the food drive is to commence so that we can supply them.

Once your food drive is completed, call The Food Bank at 358-8898 and arrange for a pick-up time.

 

How to Run a Food Drive at Your School

 

Are you thinking about conducting a food drive at your school? The Food Bank would welcome the opportunity to walk you through this easy but very important process.

The Food Bank is located at 461 Glenbrook Road in Stamford. It acts as a hub collecting food from various sources, ensuring its delivery to some 85 agencies and programs throughout lower Fairfield County, some of whose clients are the people profiled below. In 2012, The Food Bank distributed over 2,000,000 pounds of food.

Food drives are important because they can produce an enormous supply of quality food. The food collected feeds the clients of The Food Bank's member agencies. I am sure you are curious to know a little about these clients. One is a senior citizen who must choose between food and taking his medication. Another is a single mom who works two jobs just to pay the rent. Additionally, our community has many newly arrived immigrants who are struggling to start their American dream.

These individuals need a boost in life. You may ask, "What's a boost and how important is one?" Let's try an analogy. Remember when you were younger and simply couldn't climb over a fence? No matter how hard you tried you could not get your own body weight over the fence. Then your friend took his hands and locked his fingers together. You put your foot in his hands, he heaved his hands skyward as you hauled your body upwards. Then you were over the fence. He gave you a boost! "Boost me!" was the phrase. You didn't need your friend to boost you forever. Soon you were climbing fences on your own. When you help The Food Bank you are giving people a life boost. A life boost is probably one of the most important aids you can give because it has the potential to change someone's life for the better.

You now know about The Food Bank's clients. Now let's discuss food. What kind of food is collected at a food drive? It shouldn't surprise you to know that it's the same type of food you and I eat. Some of the favorites are peanut butter and grape jelly, macaroni and cheese, canned tuna, fruit juices, jarred spaghetti sauce, breakfast cereals, white rice, soups, and crackers. Use your imagination, if you like to see it on your table then chances are another person will enjoy it too!

Now you need to get the message out. You must first talk to your teacher and school administration to get their approval. Start talking to other students. Brainstorm ideas on how to tailor a food drive to your school population. An idea like charging a donation of food for admission to a school function is a fun and productive way to meet your goal. It is nice to conduct your drive at holiday times. However, keep in mind that hunger is an every day event. A food drive anytime of the year is great. Once you have decided on an approach, prepare your flyer. Make sure you include the who (your school), the what (the purpose of the food drive), and the when (choose specific dates when the collection begins and when it ends). Lastly, make sure your flyer informs your prospective donors where to bring the food. Get your teacher's approval on the contents of your flyer before it is distributed.

Make sure you've allowed enough time for your donors to receive your flyer and obtain the food to be donated (i.e., a flyer distributed on a Thursday for a food drive to start the following Monday and to end on Friday gives enough notice). Once your food drive is completed, you may call The Food Bank at 358-8898 and arrange for a pick-up time. Good luck and have fun!